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Geofront System Engineering

It is now attracted a grate deal of attention to utilize underground space (Geofront) as the new space in order to preserve environment of geo-surface and urban surroundings and utilize them well. Considering environment and creating, conserving and maintaining underground space, we are educating students and researching on following themes:Research to explicate (dynamical and hydraulical) specific of soil, rock and water underground from the surface to deep underground and develop measurement technology for it.Geo risk management research to manage underground space considering specific uncertainty of soil and rock, social requirement and its cost.Research on complex problems combined above to solve complicated behavior of soil, rock and water.

Academic Staff

Mamoru MIMURA

Mamoru MIMURAProfessor (Graduate School of Engineering)

Research Topics

Rational geotechnical modeling and elasto-viscoplastic numerical procedure have been developed to assess the long-term large deformation and stability of the soft soil deposits that are situating along metropolitan bay area. The research activities are also directed towards developing a sophisticated tool for sounding, such as "radio-isotope cone penetrometer" that can precisely detect the wet density as well as natural water content to evaluate the quality of soft soil deposits. Urban geoinformatics is one of the newly developed research field in which geoinformatics database plays a significant role to assess the fragility of local ground and assist for regional geo-disaster mitigation. In addition, archaeological geotechnics is a recent matter of concern to restore and conserve various historical geo-remains with authenticity.

Contacts

Room 212, C claster 1, Katsura Campus
TEL: +81-75-383-3304
FAX: +81-75-383-3307
E-mail: mimura.mamoru.3r@kyoto-u.ac.jp

Yousuke HIGO

Yousuke HIGOAssociate Professor (Graduate School of Engineering)

Research Topics

Geomaterial is a multi-phase mixture composed of soil, water and air. It is important, therefore, to study microscopic changes in soil structures and phase interactions for fully understanding overall macroscopic behavior. We aim to clarify a link between the microscopic and macroscopic behaviors through experiments using x-ray tomography technique. Furthremore, we are developing analysis methods based on the physical origins to predict macroscopic geotechnical issues such as geoharzards induced by rainfalls and earthquakes.

Contacts

Room 211, C claster 1, Katsura Campus
TEL: +81-75-383-3305
FAX: +81-75-383-3307
E-mail: higo.yohsuke.5z@kyoto-u.ac.jp

Mai SAWADA

Mai SAWADAAssistant Professor (Graduate School of Engineering)

Research Topics

Tumulus mounds known as the oldest earth structures have been seriously damaged by precipitation, earthquake and man-caused destructions resulting in slope failure in a mound, water infiltration into the burial chamber and deterioration of the paintings in the chamber accompanied by salt crystallization, dew condensation and fungi. We are responsible for controlling these damages and passing the tumulus mounds to future generations. To accomplish this mission, conservation and restoration of tumulus mounds are necessary to be considered in terms of geoengineering, namely deformation, strength and seepage characteristics of soils. The key points for conservation and restoration of tumulus mounds are controlling of the stability and infiltration of the mounds and hydrothermal environment in the chambers. We have been studying on these points based on geotechnical experiments and numerical analyses.

Contacts

Room 213, C claster 1, Katsura Campus 
TEL: +81-75-383-3306
FAX: +81-75-383-3307
E-mail: sawada.mai.6c@kyoto-u.ac.jp

Research Topics

Numerical Simulations of Soft Ground with Elasto-viscoplastic Constitutive Model

Sand and soft clay layers are widely distributed in the coastal urban area and often suffered from ground settlement and liquefaction. In this research field, we developed numerical simulation code with elasto-viscoplastic constitutive model to investigate the mechanical behavior of soft ground and applied to actual problems such as long-term settlement of the ground under the Kansai international airport.

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Geotechnical Contribution for the Preservation and Restoration of Ancient Tumulus and Masonry Structures

Historical monuments such as ancient tumulus/mound and masonry structures are weak against wind and rain, earthquakes, and damage caused by plants and animals and it is difficult to keep them intact for long time. In this research field, we investigate the preservation and resto-ration methodologies of historical monuments to maintain their authenticity based on soil/rock engineering aspects.

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Modelling Deformation Characteristics of Geomaterials from Micro to Macro

Geomaterial is a multi-phase mixture composed of soil, water and air. It is important, therefore, to study micro-scopic changes in soil structures and phase interactions. We aim to clarify a link between the microscopic and mac-roscopic behaviors through experiments. Furthremore, we are developing analysis methods based on the physical origins to predict macroscopic geotechnical issues such as geoharzards induced by rainfalls and earthquakes.

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Modeling and visualization of underground structures and application to disaster assessment

It is usually difficult to observe ground except for the surface, although the deformation and failure of the ground are closely related to the underground structures. We have been studying on geophysical explorations that enable visualization of wide-area underground structures and 3D-modeling of ground using boring database. The underground structures provided by these observations contribute to the numerical analysis and microzoning for disaster assessment such as evaluation of rainfall infiltration into earth structures and liquefaction mapping.

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Laboratory Website

http://geotech.kuciv.kyoto-u.ac.jp/index.html